Leeds Art Gallery & The Henry Moore Institute, Leeds

All, Galleries, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds Art Gallery, Location, West Yorkshire

Right in the heart of Leeds, these conjoined galleries offer a heady mixture of elegant modern art and challenging contemporary sculpture. This is complimented by the café, library and older sections of the building, making it a must-visit if you’re in the city.

The Henry Moore Institute (named after the sculptor of the bulbous semi-abstract bronze pieces) is a clean, sharp black block attached to the Victorian municipal architecture of the Gallery. It contains a handful of often multi-sensory, large footprint installations. Across the short skyway, you enter the Leeds Art Gallery and things become a little more… familiar. The emphasis is very much on the modern art, and I struggled to find anything that pre-dates the 1800s.

The Tiled Cafe is absolutely magnificent and quite vast, which perhaps made my baked potato appear even more diddy than it actually was. The vegetarian chilli topping was very tasty though and the chesterfield sofas make it a very inviting spot for an hour or so with a book.

My favourite bits:

  • A Corner of the Baron’s Larder (1849 – 1888) by Henry Weekes is, at a distance, a bog standard still life until you spot the dead swan, upturned pitcher and complete and utter lack of order reflecting the societal upheaval of the time.
  • The Lives of Others: Sites of Memory is a grim but beautiful mosaic of epitaphs dedicated to the memory of those who sacrificed their own lives to save others’ in dozens of every day disasters.
  • A quintet of bronze figures cast by various artists and creating a striking silhouetted line up of characters, like some sort of artistic superhero squad!
  • Anthony Gormley’s Maquette for the Leeds Brick Man is a scaled prototype of an aborted civic project, made up of miniscule clay bricks. The project would have been 120ft tall with balconies out of the ears to look out over the city.
  • It was fun to play with Rashid Johnson’s interactive and moisturising shea butter blocks as part of Shea Butter Three Ways. Perhaps I missed the finer points of the message…
  • Keir Smith’s Stencils for:… is a really cool example of the process becoming the art and the rusted metal, agricultural tools and rectangular layout have a satisfying toughness.
  • The ghostly, geometric worshippers in The Day of Atonement by Jacob Kramer.

The scores:

Exhibits: 8/10. A really engaging collection that covers a lot of ground.

Environment: 8/10. Beautifully tiled interior and bright spaces but frayed round the edges.

Refreshments: 9/10. The tiled café is a really unique and stunning place. Pricey for Leeds.

Cost and Location: 10/10. In the heart of Leeds and free of charge so perfect!

Overall Score: 9/10. Great collection, character and cost to make Leeds very proud.

The links:

Leeds City Museum, Leeds

All, Leeds City Museum, Museums, West Yorkshire

Leeds City Museum provides an interesting hour or two exploring a varied (if slightly disjointed) collection of exhibits, staying true to the multiculturalism of modern day Leeds. The museum is well set up for kids with plenty of activities, low-level exhibits and a recreation area so there are plenty of young families which gives the place a nice (but noisy!) buzz.

The museum follows a roughly chronological order starting on the top floor with a whistle-stop tour through ancient and medieval Leeds and Yorkshire. The bulk of the exhibits are naturally from the industrial revolution onwards, when production and prosperity exploded in Leeds. There’s also a colourful collection of modern exhibits documenting the stories of immigrants and particularly the Asian populations of the city.

The café on the ground floor offered very affordable stodge at under a fiver and an even cheaper kids menu. Decent cup of coffee too.

My favourite bits:

  • The Wolf and Twins mosaic, which depicted the tale of Romulus and Remus and the founding of Rome in someone’s villa in Aldborough in the 4th century.
  • An 2,500 year old pipe (looks a recorder for beginners) found in Malham, carved from a sheep’s leg bone with visible teeth marks!
  • A glittering boiler from the 1880s, the same decade Taylor’s of Harrogate were starting out on their journey to take over the British tea business.
  • A gorgeous Syrian wall tile from the mid-1800s, the inscription reads: All that is on the face of the earth will perish, but the Face of your Lord, the Glorious, the Gracious, will forever remain.
  • A delicate palm-sized globe from 1825 – 1835 which was advertised as “a correct globe with the new discoveries” including Australia and the South Pacific Islands.
  • The mummified remains and facial reconstruction of Nesyamun, who lived and died in Thebes around 3,000 years ago. He was a priest in the Temple of Amun who looked after the sacrificial bulls.
  • A beautifully arranged bureau of butterflies, moths, fossils, Victorian stationery and a microscope in the Collectors Cabinet section of the museum.

The scores:

Exhibits: 5/10. A very wide range, a little piecemeal and very few showstoppers.

Environment: 5/10. Décor tired and functional with the odd child’s tantrum in earshot.

Refreshments: 6/10. Cheap, filling, unexciting.

Cost & Location: 9/10. At the top of town in the city’s cultural quarter and free.

Overall Score: 6/10. A great local museum, but in need of a refresh.

The links:

Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield

All, Galleries, West Yorkshire, Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Yorkshire Sculpture Park offers a powerful and curious selection of sculptures in a glorious open air countryside setting. It’s an unusual combination of an artistic adventure and a weekend walk, so your dog can come too.

The Weston restaurant has an interesting lunch menu (£8-12) and classic teatime fare. The Lemon and Raspberry Drizzle cake and a cup of Lemon and Ginger tea went down well after completing the 4-mile circuit.

My favourite bits:

  • A hearty stroll up to the site’s centre past Damien Hirst’ s Myth (pictured),a flayed unicorn, and the half-peeled giant The Virgin Mother.
  • David Smith’s story in the Underground Gallery, told through his elegant and economic blacksmithing (pictured) and his weighty anti-war Medals of Dishonour.
  • An intimidating Circle of Animals / Zodiac Heads (pictured) staring down like a disapproving council of aldermen, created by internationally renowned artist/political prisoner Ai Weiwei.
  • A pair of ornate medieval chessmen (pictured), King Hezekiah and Moses doing various unpleasant things to unfortunate snakes.

The scores:

Exhibits: 8/10. World famous names from the contemporary scene and generations past.

Environment: 9/10. A beautiful and unique site, loses a point for its remoteness.

Refreshments: 7/10. Tea and cake perfectly fine, I’ll need to try the lunch menu next time.

Cost & Location: 7/10. Free entry, plus £3.50 to £12 parking… and you’ll need a car!

Overall Score: 7/10.

The links: